IDEAL Real Estate, LLC



Posted by IDEAL Real Estate, LLC on 12/31/2017

Pets are a part of the family. When we welcome a new dog into the home, we often expect them to meet our standards of behavior without much guidance. Dogs, like children, require consistent training from all members of the family. They need positive reinforcement and clear signals from you to teach them what behavior is acceptable.

In this article, weíre going to cover some important house training tips for you and your canine companion. Weíll look at some of the common mistakes that new pet owners make, and talk about ways to curb undesirable behavior like chewing shoes or furniture or barking at windows.


Traits vs. behaviors

One common mistake new pet owners make is to attempt to place character traits on their dog. Words like pushy, protective, mischievous, etc. are all adjectives that we often use to describe our dogs.

However, as dog owners and home owners, our energy is better spent on recognizing and correcting behaviors. If your dog tears at a carpet or chews the corner of your sofa, it isnít very helpful sitting around thinking of adjectives to describe your dog (like restless or anxious). Rather, we should think about the behavior itself and how to replace it.

Letís jump right into some household behaviors and ways to replace them with desirable alternatives.

Chewing

Chewing is an important part of a dogís life. Chewing itself is not a negative behavior, but when your dog starts demolishing furniture or eating your homework, itís time to take steps to curb this behavior.

First, make sure your dog is eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise. Dogs who arenít eating a fat and protein rich food or who are overeating are prone to having excessive energy. If theyíre trapped indoors and have nothing to focus that energy on, theyíll turn to chewing things they arenít supposed to.

To focus your dogís energy on positive behaviors, take your dog for a walk, jog, or play with them. If you notice your dog attempting to chew things they shouldnít be, draw their attention away and provide them with a better alternative.

Barking

Just like chewing, barking is not in itself a negative behavior. Itís when your dog barks excessively and inappropriately that it becomes problematic.

Dogs bark for several reasons: to get you to play, to show that theyíre stressed or bored, and so on. If your dog spends a lot of time monitoring doors and windows and barking at passersby, there are a few things you can do to curb the behavior.

First, take away the trigger. In this case, that could be closing the curtains or restricting your dogís access to the room. If your dog is worried about strangers passing by the house, they are likely already too tense to begin training an alternative behavior to barking. If itís noises that alarm your dog, try playing soft music to mask the noises for a day or two.

Once youíre ready to start training, have someone walk past outside where your dog can see from the window or make a noticeable noise outside. Reward your dog with treats when they do not react until they become more comfortable with the outside distractions.




Tags: dogs   pets   dog training   pet behavior  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by IDEAL Real Estate, LLC on 5/7/2017

Many new homeowners see getting a dog as a rite of passage to homeownership. Oftentimes, theyíre moving from apartment buildings that didnít allow dogs or parents who didnít want pets and having their own home finally seems like their chance at having a dog. However, itís important to take into consideration several factors before buying or adopting a dog.

In this article, weíll talk about what it means to be both a dog owner and a homeowner, and discuss how to tell if buying a dog is a good move for you in your new home.

Time management

It has been said that having a dog is like having a two-year-old child who stays that difficult age for ten years. Depending on the dogís breed, temperament, and trainability, thereís a chance you could be in for a handful of a dog.

The first factor in deciding whether or not to get a dog in your new home is to determine if you have the time to take care of it. If you work long hours or have to travel for work, these are obvious signals that you might not have time to spend with a pet who needs care and attention.

However, you should also consider whether you have an extra hour each morning and evening to feed and play with your dog who will need exercise to stay healthy. Youíll also need to set aside time each week for things like training, socializing, bathing, trimming their nails, and so on.

All of these commitments add up, so itís important to consider how much time you have before going down to the shelter to or kennel to pick up a new dog.

Dogs are expensive

Most people who donít own a dog do not realize how expensive they are. Food is just the tip of the iceberg, and if youíre planning on getting a large dog, food can cost you well over $100 each month. On top of food, youíll need to be prepared to spend up to $200 for each visit to the vet and for necessary medications for things like heartworm, fleas, and ticks.

Dog training is also highly recommended to ensure that you and your dog both have a better understanding of whatís expected of one another. Training will help with things like obedience, but also will improve your dogís behavior by giving them a job to focus their energy on (rather than on tearing up your furniture).

Dogs need space

It may seem like you have all the space in the world in your new home, especially if you moved from a small apartment. However, many dog breeds require room to run freely. If you want to get a sporting dog, youíll either need to take them somewhere they can run each day, or have a yard large enough for them to run in.

If you choose the latter, youíll need to make sure your dog is safe from traffic if you live on a busy street. That could mean spending hundreds of dollars to erect a fence.

Ultimately, having a dog can be a highly rewarding experience for you and your pet. But now that you know some of the fine print to dog ownership, youíll be able to make a more informed decision on whether or not getting a dog is right for you.




Tags: home   dogs   dog  
Categories: Uncategorized  




Tags